Best Curriculum Vitae (CV) Writing Tips ( With Video )

When applying for certain positions in the US, as well as jobs internationally, you may be required to submit a curriculum vitae rather than a resume. A curriculum vitae, or CV, includes more information than your typical resume, including details of your education and academic achievements, research, publications, awards, affiliations, and more.
Here you can review curriculum vitae samples, learn about the difference between a CV and a resume, and glean tips and advice on how to write a CV.

What to Include in a Curriculum Vitae

A curriculum vitae, commonly referred to as a “CV,” is a longer (two or more pages), more detailed synopsis than a resume. Your CV should be clear, concise, complete, and up-to-date with current employment and educational information.
The following are examples of information that can be included in your curriculum vitae. The elements that you include will depend on what you are applying for, so be sure to incorporate the most relevant information to support your candidacy in your CV.
  • Personal details and contact information. Most CVs start with contact information and personal data but take care to avoid superfluous details, such as religious affiliation, children’s names, and so on.
  • Education and qualifications. Be sure to include the names of institutions and dates attended in reverse order: Ph.D., Masters, Undergraduate.
  • Work experience/employment history. The most widely accepted style of employment record is the chronological curriculum vitae. Your career history is presented in reverse date order starting with the most recent appointment. More emphasis/information should be placed on your most recent jobs.
  • Skills. Include computer skills, foreign language skills, and any other recent training that is relevant to the role applied for.
  • Training / Graduate Fieldwork / Study Abroad
  • Dissertations / Theses
  • Research experience
  • Teaching experience
  • Publications
  • Presentations, lectures, and exhibitions
  • Grants, scholarships, fellowships, and assistantships
  • Awards and honors
  • Technical, computer, and language skills
  • Professional licenses, certifications, and memberships

What Not to Include

There is no need to include your photo, your salary history, the reason you left your previous position, or references in a CV submitted for jobs in the United States. References should be listed separately and given to employers upon request.
Note, however, that the requirements for international CVs differ, and depend upon the country to which you are applying. In other countries, private information like your date of birth, nationality, marital status, how many children you have, and a photograph may be required.

How Long Should a CV Be?

A good, entry-level curriculum vitae should ideally cover two to three pages (CVs for mid-level professionals, especially in academia and medical research roles, may run longer). Aim to ensure the content is clear, structured, concise, and relevant. Using bullet points rather than full sentences can help minimize word usage.

Curriculum Vitae Sample

The following is a curriculum vitae example for an entry-level candidate for a faculty position in the US. This CV includes employment history, education, competencies, awards, skills, and personal interests. Download the CV template (compatible with Google Docs and Word Online) or see below for more examples.
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